Reloader’s Bench: The Barnes 130 grain .308 TSX – Part 2

Well, range day has come and gone. I had only the opportunity to put together 8 rounds of the 130 grain TSX bullets. Of those 8, I only fired half, and for good reason. Actually, it is the reason it is always a good idea to work your loads up and check for signs of pressure.

Right off the bat, you could see signs of pressure in the primers. Worth noting is that the Barnes load data had a minimum and maximum Varget powder loading for that bullet of 47.5 grains and 52 grains. Barnes was also using Winchester brass and Federal primers, whereas I was using Federal brass, once fired, and CCI benchrest primers. Though admittedly, for the loads I am trying to push forward with, it might not be a bad idea to look at the CCI #34 NATO spec primers as they are designed for semi auto fire and have a stronger cup.

Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Reloader's Bench Leave a comment

Reloader’s Bench: The Barnes 130 grain .308 TSX – Part 1

This will be my first in a number of articles on ammo reloading. Just to preface this article, I had recently gotten into firearms with the purpose of enjoyment and hunting. This would have been about early 2013. In the time since, I have purchased a number of different firearms, encompasing calibers from .22LR to .500 Smith and Wesson (yes, I got one of those bad boys, which I’ll write about some other time).

One of the things that I really started to get into was reloading. Partially because .500 S&W ammo was very expensive, but also because I can really get fully customized with the ammunition I put together and tune it to purpose and firearm.

In this article, I am talking mainly about the Barnes TSX 130 grain .308 bullet. First off, let’s discuss the bullet itself. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Reloader's Bench Leave a comment

Recipe Formulation Part 5: Getting to Know Your Ingredients – Introduction

There are three key points when it comes to building your recipe from scratch. Flavour, aroma, mouthfeel. These three points of course are the most important points when looking at it from a BJCP perspective that aren’t covered by simple numbers… well, except for the flavour of bitterness, but even that can be inaccurate if other bitter ingredients are introduced, like cocoa. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew Leave a comment

Recipe Formulation Part 4: Calculating Colour

The colour of your beer can answer a number of questions, and as a consequence, has a bunch of information related to it in order to properly measure it. Maybe not perfectly, but you can get a general idea. Many beer styles are defined by colour, so it is a good idea to get a general understanding as to how this can be calculated. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew Leave a comment

Recipe Formulation Part 3: Calculating Bitterness

The IBU is an acronym for International Bittering Units. The number one contributor to IBUs is hops, and those can be easily calculated simply because there are tons of formulas out there to help us figure that out. That and the hop growers were nice enough to tell us how much alpha acids, the main bittering agent in hops, there are as a percentage of the weight of the hop. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew Leave a comment

Recipe Formulation Part 2: Calculating Gravities and Alcohol

The gravity of your beer is one of the most critical components of recipe formulation. The gravity of distilled water is 1. The more soluble sugars make their way into solution, the heavier the wort. It then goes to say that the heavier the wort, the more alcohol you will probably get out of your beer when fermentation is complete. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew 2 Comments

Kicking Off Fermentation of Mead, and Dealing with Acidity

Lately, I’ve decided to begin expanding my horizons in making fine alcoholic beverages. My latest foray has been mead. After using a lot of honey in beers, I figured it was time to actually use honey as the showpiece. It wasn’t simply that, but every time I stop by the Fallen Timber Meadery in Water Valley, I always get treated to great samples of quality meads. I figure since I like their mead so much, might as well grab another bucket of their honey.

Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew 2 Comments

Recipe Formulation Part 1: Introduction


BJCP Style Guideline for Category 1A – Lite American Lager

This series will cover two main topics as it pertains to building your homebrew recipe from scratch. We will use a BJCP style guideline to illustrate these points.

When I build a recipe looking at these style guidelines, I always look at the vital statistics of the beer first. This is where you get your fancy abbreviations like OG, FG, IBU, SRM and ABV. For the sake of clarity:

OG = Original Gravity, typically used to describe the weight of the wort before fermentation. This will generally indicate total soluble sugars in the wort, but will not tell you the kind of sugars. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew Leave a comment

Evil Shenanigans Imperial Honey Stout

This is a recipe that had won me a gold medal in the category for stouts for the Cowtown YeastWranglers Homebrew Roundup. It originally started with a trip to the Fallen Timber Meadery, where I ended up meeting Colin Ryan and some of his employees. We enjoyed a good chat, and bored the heck out of the kids for about an hour, but part of that day involved a good chat by the fermenters, and a sampling of some of their homebrews. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Homebrew 2 Comments

Inside HPC: Tycrid Aims GPU Technology at Bioinformatics Market

This article is reposted on my site of an interview I had done for Inside HPC. The original article can be found at: http://insidehpc.com/2009/11/16/tycrid-positions-gpu-bioinformatics-market

11.16.2009
inside SC09

insideHPC sat down with Chris Heier, president of Tycrid Platform Technologies, a first-time SC09 exhibitor based in Canada, to learn more about their purpose built GPU-based solutions and their focus on the Bioinformatics space. Read more

Posted on by Chris Heier in Technology Leave a comment